CURRENT EXHIBIT


Homecoming Too Image

Homecoming Too
Apr 29 - May 30, 2015

Jay Yao


When you think of it, the absence of photographs leaves a
serious gap; it even presents a problem.
- Marguerite Duras, Vie matérielle.
 
Another homecoming comes along for Jay Yao by way of Homecoming Too, a peculiar mélange of a departure and a continuation from his previous work entitled Homecoming. With this new show, he furthers his curiosity over designers like Rajo Laurel, Patis Tesoro, Brian Tenorio, and Willar Mateo with his attempt to recreate their childhood memories—exploration of the places in line with their childhood, the people and the objects associated with these memories, the way these memories inspire them, and how a mix of nostalgia for these particular memories and places create different fragmented narratives that actively attributes to the designer they are at present.
 
The past and the present tense pursue both coherence and incoherence at the same time. There are many different sides to these narratives that blend in together into an infinite sea of grey zones. In each one of us there’s always that idealised notion of trying to reconstruct memories and relive them yet underneath all that is the ironic side of such undertaking. One can try to recreate these memories but one can only try and only concede that they can’t be redone, as it was the first time.
 
Yao’s semi-ethnographic, partly nostalgic journey into these memories give us these fragmented narratives that are both celebratory and irreverent with the radical actuality that these images can forge new identities, new possibilities, encourage further discourse, and come up with new narratives about these designers. It’s much like the pervasiveness of the image in contemporary society where images always make our thoughts linger and struggle for our attention. And the recall of these images is always subject to interpretation of each and every spectator and how one’s own memory assumes a particular reality to these images. 

---Gian Cruz

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ARTIST'S TALK, AND PHOTOGRAPHY TECHNIQUES & CONTEMPORARY ISSUE WORKSHOP
with 
Jay Yao & Kristoffer Ardeña

May 30, 1PM at Artinformal
limited slots (8 people)

RSVP
Angelyn Marquez +639178976691 / 7258518
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Sacred Valley Image

Sacred Valley
Apr 29 - May 30, 2015

Winnie Go


Sacred Valley, ceramics artist Winnie Go’s fourth solo exhibition, takes one through a sensate journey into the natural world.  More than a hundred small works from hand built clay testify to the treasures yielded by the earth: seeds and fruits, root crops and flowers. Fusing forms with elements from baskets and textiles, the works speak of a yearning for the simpler pleasures of life and a thankfulness for harvests, real and symbolic.

--Lisa Ito



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The Hounds of Eden Image

The Hounds of Eden
Apr 29 - May 30, 2015

Bree Jonson


Eden is often taken as the Biblical garden where man and woman first drew their breaths. The soil was fertile and from it grew and abundance of verdant plant life. It is often remembered as a time of peace and gaiety, a haven wherein equilibrium existed and no dearth of any kind was experienced.
 
Herein I present to you my own personal depiction of Eden, a garden of abundance wherein the hounds of the hunt meander about. A place that was first predisposed to peace and is now subjected to turmoil by its inhabitants. It is not certain whether they have ran out of possible targets, or they have simply stopped looking. What is evident is that, instead of hunting their prey, they have started to hunt down each other. Nobody exists to reprimand and put them back in their places. It’s freewill taken to an extreme, to a disregard of other’s welfare. Some team up; some try to cover their scents and hide; and a significant number die. Armed with the same armaments of sight and smell as one another, it becomes a battle of wit within a bountiful terrain that was once their home.
 
This could be seen as an actual metaphor to what humanity does to its own kind on a daily basis, treading upon the other with no clear logical reason at all. This could also be seen as a reflection of my own fondness for stories and aesthetic of this genre; seeing it as a form of entertainment –perhaps my own way of coping: taking a stride of humor in face of everyday dark realities. Chaos exists where it need not be. I have taken extra effort, and took sheer joy in doing so, in honing in on this chaos and magnifying it until it becomes a morbid entity of its own. The Hounds of Eden is the candid irony of what it is really, the hunt of the hunt.


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