CURRENT EXHIBIT


Faulty Landscape Image

Faulty Landscape
Sep 4 - Sep 22, 2014

Nilo Ilarde


The topography of history

In this exhibition, Nilo Ilarde assembles both terrain and constellation from thousands of small, salvaged objects: caps, tubes and brushes that are all tools of the painter’s trade.
 
The series of installations are Ilarde’s response to a found text: a phrase extracted from a 1997 Frieze essay by Irish writer Kevin Power on the work of Spanish abstractionist Juan Uslé, jotted down as it caught the artist’s attention.
 
We witness the painters move from the painting of landscapes to the landscape of painting: the phrase echoes in its omnipresence. Now, words are made material, translated into an encounter with the visuality of form. Isolated and suspended, the appropriated text acquires a corporeal character of its own, overlooking a mound of pigment and refuse.
 
This writing on the walls precisely underscores the anxiety of the contemporary, for the medium of painting is inextricably linked to the history of modernism in Philippine art. Ilarde’s works, however, compellingly demonstrate how even implements for artistic production—often swept behind the scenes, unseen and unacknowledged—can themselves be imbued with a distinct materiality and aesthetic quality, separate from that of the masterpiece created using these media.
 
The objects used for the installations date back to several decades. The artist started collecting discarded art materials in 2002, eventually acquiring thousands of old paint tubes, hundreds of brushes, pencils and erasers from other Philippine artists. These things are in themselves silent repositories of the past: used to create hundreds of art works that have since then propelled their makers to fame or notoriety (or both).
 
Before, Ilarde usually housed his collection of tubes in clear acrylic displays. This time, however, the artist lets more objects loose from their previous states of containment. Thousands of caps are removed, scattered and stuck across the walls to form constellations. Used brushes form a field, plotted and planted. Dried remains of pigment are excised and exhibited like artefacts. Paint tubes are drained and heaped together to form a mountain or midden of discards, redolent with the odour of linseed.
 
The resulting installations denote both the archeological and the natural, inviting the viewer to scrutinize and immerse oneself in the materiality of painting. Embodying extended spans of time and space, these collectively construct a topography of artistic production: a continually shifting landscape open to more excavations and explorations.
 
---Lisa Ito


Installation Views




Works


No works found.


Faulty Landscape Image

Faulty Landscape
Sep 4 - Sep 22, 2014

Nilo Ilarde


The topography of history

In this exhibition, Nilo Ilarde assembles both terrain and constellation from thousands of small, salvaged objects: caps, tubes and brushes that are all tools of the painter’s trade.
 
The series of installations are Ilarde’s response to a found text: a phrase extracted from a 1997 Frieze essay by Irish writer Kevin Power on the work of Spanish abstractionist Juan Uslé, jotted down as it caught the artist’s attention.
 
We witness the painters move from the painting of landscapes to the landscape of painting: the phrase echoes in its omnipresence. Now, words are made material, translated into an encounter with the visuality of form. Isolated and suspended, the appropriated text acquires a corporeal character of its own, overlooking a mound of pigment and refuse.
 
This writing on the walls precisely underscores the anxiety of the contemporary, for the medium of painting is inextricably linked to the history of modernism in Philippine art. Ilarde’s works, however, compellingly demonstrate how even implements for artistic production—often swept behind the scenes, unseen and unacknowledged—can themselves be imbued with a distinct materiality and aesthetic quality, separate from that of the masterpiece created using these media.
 
The objects used for the installations date back to several decades. The artist started collecting discarded art materials in 2002, eventually acquiring thousands of old paint tubes, hundreds of brushes, pencils and erasers from other Philippine artists. These things are in themselves silent repositories of the past: used to create hundreds of art works that have since then propelled their makers to fame or notoriety (or both).
 
Before, Ilarde usually housed his collection of tubes in clear acrylic displays. This time, however, the artist lets more objects loose from their previous states of containment. Thousands of caps are removed, scattered and stuck across the walls to form constellations. Used brushes form a field, plotted and planted. Dried remains of pigment are excised and exhibited like artefacts. Paint tubes are drained and heaped together to form a mountain or midden of discards, redolent with the odour of linseed.
 
The resulting installations denote both the archeological and the natural, inviting the viewer to scrutinize and immerse oneself in the materiality of painting. Embodying extended spans of time and space, these collectively construct a topography of artistic production: a continually shifting landscape open to more excavations and explorations.
 
---Lisa Ito


Installation Views




Works


No works found.


Faulty Landscape Image

Faulty Landscape
Sep 4 - Sep 22, 2014

Nilo Ilarde


The topography of history

In this exhibition, Nilo Ilarde assembles both terrain and constellation from thousands of small, salvaged objects: caps, tubes and brushes that are all tools of the painter’s trade.
 
The series of installations are Ilarde’s response to a found text: a phrase extracted from a 1997 Frieze essay by Irish writer Kevin Power on the work of Spanish abstractionist Juan Uslé, jotted down as it caught the artist’s attention.
 
We witness the painters move from the painting of landscapes to the landscape of painting: the phrase echoes in its omnipresence. Now, words are made material, translated into an encounter with the visuality of form. Isolated and suspended, the appropriated text acquires a corporeal character of its own, overlooking a mound of pigment and refuse.
 
This writing on the walls precisely underscores the anxiety of the contemporary, for the medium of painting is inextricably linked to the history of modernism in Philippine art. Ilarde’s works, however, compellingly demonstrate how even implements for artistic production—often swept behind the scenes, unseen and unacknowledged—can themselves be imbued with a distinct materiality and aesthetic quality, separate from that of the masterpiece created using these media.
 
The objects used for the installations date back to several decades. The artist started collecting discarded art materials in 2002, eventually acquiring thousands of old paint tubes, hundreds of brushes, pencils and erasers from other Philippine artists. These things are in themselves silent repositories of the past: used to create hundreds of art works that have since then propelled their makers to fame or notoriety (or both).
 
Before, Ilarde usually housed his collection of tubes in clear acrylic displays. This time, however, the artist lets more objects loose from their previous states of containment. Thousands of caps are removed, scattered and stuck across the walls to form constellations. Used brushes form a field, plotted and planted. Dried remains of pigment are excised and exhibited like artefacts. Paint tubes are drained and heaped together to form a mountain or midden of discards, redolent with the odour of linseed.
 
The resulting installations denote both the archeological and the natural, inviting the viewer to scrutinize and immerse oneself in the materiality of painting. Embodying extended spans of time and space, these collectively construct a topography of artistic production: a continually shifting landscape open to more excavations and explorations.
 
---Lisa Ito


Installation Views




Works


No works found.